What is functional nutrition?

Functional nutrition wants to restore the well-functioning of the body through food, lifestyle and supplement interventions. Sounds common sense, right? So how do I do that?

Root cause

To start with I want to find the root cause(s) of your health conditions rather than simply treating symptoms. An example. When you have gas and bloating you could take a pill from the chemist to be less bothered by your symptoms. But that doesn’t do anything about why you’re having them. Are you not chewing? Are you eating on the go? Do you have an imbalance in gut bacteria? Are you eating foods you’re sensitive to? By finding out what is causing your gas and bloating we can address things at the root.

What works for you?

The question is: how to find those root causes and see where we need to work. That’s where the systems I work with come in handy. I look extensively at your  history: your health and important events in your life. This allows me to get to know you well. And that’s necessary, because your body is different from my body. So your diet will need to be different from my diet. This is why I don’t work with one diet or protocol – it just often doesn’t work!

By mapping your symptoms I can see where we have some work to do: do we need to focus on gut health (always!), improve your immune system, support your liver, bring balance to your hormones, reduce the amount of toxins you’re exposed to?

Education empowers

Education is  very important part of functional nutrition. To start with I help you to master the skill of listening to your own body. Only when you learn to pick up the subtle – or sometimes not so subtle… – messages from your body, you can start to work out what works for you and what doesn’t. So you can take back control of your health and feel at home in your body.

By  educating you I also want to help you to understand how your body works, why you have your symptoms and why certain foods and practices are helpful or not. It helps to know why you need to change your diet and habits, it makes it easier to do. And something else:  when you know what works for you, you no longer get confused by the information about food you’re bombarded with in the media: is yoghurt healthy,  should you be eating raw, cooked, meat or eggs or be vegan? It all depends on your body and digestion.

When you know more about your diagnosis, your body and how to take care of yourself, you’ll be a more empowered partner in the conversation with your doctor or practitioner. You will know better which choices to make and your doctor will appreciate working with you because you genuinely take care of yourself.

I’m not a functional doctor, so my role is never to diagnose, treat, or prescribe. That’s outside my scope of practice. But I’m happy to work together with your doctor or other practitioners, like acupuncturists, psychotherapists, osteopaths, energy healers etc. Especially when you are dealing with a chronic issue it’s often not just about diet and lifestyle. There can be many root causes and they all need to be addressed.

Want to know more?

Are you curious about what I can do for you? Let’s talk on the phone then and explore if we are a good match. I see clients in person in Findhorn, Scotland but also work with people via Skype. So living somewhere else in the UK or even in Europe is not a problem at all.

Just send me a message via my contact form below so we can schedule your free 15 minute phone conversation.

9 tips for gluten-free shopping


Have you seen the gluten free shelves in the supermarket expanding? Many people are aware of their gluten sensitivity or even have coeliac disease. And the gluten-free food industry is eagerly stepping in. Which doesn’t mean that gluten free products are necessarily healthy: they’re almost always highly processed and contain lots of sugar, soy and processed oils.

So what to do if you want or need to go an a healthy gluten free diet? Here are some tips to help you transition:

  1. Shop on the outside aisles of your supermarket. That’s where the healthy foods are usually located. So stock up on organic fruits and vegetables, lean meats and eggs among others.
  2. Read labels!  When you buy packaged foods, it’s important to understand what they contain.  Foods that include wheat, rye, spelt, barley, or kamut contain gluten. Also, look for words like “spices,” “flavoring,” “modified food starch,” “maltodextrin,” “glucose syrup,” and “citric acid.” These can all contain gluten.  Be sure to read the ingredients list and also the “contains” section of food labels.
  3. These are the grains you can eat: quinoa, teff, buckwheat, brown rice, millet and amaranth. If you want to try oats, look for the gluten free ones. They’re not more processed than the regular ones, just grown and rolled in a safe way.
  4. ‘Gluten-free’ doesn’t necessarily mean ‘healthy‘. Especially stay away from gluten-free cakes, sweets and biscuits. They contain often loads of sugar and processed flours and are low in nutrients.
  5. Don’t buy any ready-made sauces and dressings. Make your own so you make sure they are healthy and without any gluten, sugar or processed ingredients.
  6. Go back to the kitchen and prepare your own meals. Chopping your veg and preparing your meal is a great way to unwind from a busy day. And it’s a lot cheaper as well!
  7. Find some great websites and blogs. Cooking healthy and delicious meals is so much easier now with all the inspiration you can find online. I love the Deliciouslyella blog. Her recipes are also dairy and refined sugar free. Mynewroots  is another great and very creative one. And if you love baking and sweet treats, have a look at Livia’s kitchen. Start with two or three easy meals at first.  Once you feel comfortable, move of to more challenging or time-consuming recipes.
  8. Get prepping. Make a big pot of soup and freeze it in portions. Make a batch of your favorite snacks with a friend. So that when you’re tired or uninspired you won’t be reaching for the not-so-good stuff. You’ll find more ideas in my free Healthy Eating on the Go guide.
  9. Know which alcohol to avoid. Gluten-free alcohol includes cider, wine, sherry, spirits, port and liqueurs, but remember that beer, lagers, stouts and ales contain varying amounts of gluten.

Over to you! What are your top tips for going gluten free?