Stewed apples for a happy gut!

Something as simple as stewed apple can be super helpful if you need to heal your gut:  🍏

That is something dr Michael Ash, a UK based osteopath, naturopath and nutritionist found out! 😎

He noticed with his patients that if they were eating stewed apples daily it changed their inflammatory lab markers 😮

People were able to lower their anti-inflammatory medication 🤩

Their gut was functioning better – happy poops! 💩

They lost weight 🙌

Their moods were uplifted 😊

And their gut bacteria showed a positive change 😍

If you’d like to check that I’m not talking rubbish, have a read here: https://www.clinicaleducation.org/…/is-this-a-perfect…/

You can download the recipe here:

So go and make yourself a big batch and eat it consistantly for a few weeks!

Have you tried it? Did you notice any changes? Let us know in the comments.

Apple and cinnamon yoghurt bowl

It’s fall and it’s apple time! Nothing reminds me more of autumn than the scent of apples and cinnamon…

I’m always so happy when the local apples are back! There are so many different kinds – much nicer than the always-the-same Gala’s that have been shipped all over the world.

I think this is a lovely fall breakfast that will keep you full for quite a few hours.

Let us know if you want to give it a try! You can download a PDF of the recipe here

Recipe: how to deconstruct a falafel

Who likes falafels? I do!

These deconstructed ones are much easier and quicker to make than the original ones and don’t need to be deep fried or oven baked.

Your beneficial gut microbes will love the chickpeas, onion, garlic and cumin – this recipe has lots of fiber!

There’s also a good amount of protein, it’s high in vitamin A and folate and it provides a third of your daily zinc requirement. Good to know in these times…

Oh, and this meal is great when your on a candida diet. What’s not to like about that!

You can use chickpeas from a tin but the tin lining contains BPA (read more about that here).

Using dried chickpeas takes a bit more time but is a lot cheaper and bypasses the whole BPA thing. In this hummus recipe I explain how to do it.

You can download and print this recipe here.

Are you going to give this recipe a try? Let us know in the comments!

A simple crunchy snack: tamari roasted almonds

Today’s recipe is a simple, gluten and dairy free snack with only 2 ingredients!

These tamari roasted almonds are a healthy and delicious snack. They’re crunchy and salty and keep your blood sugar balanced.

They’re also a great addition to your lunch or dinner! Almonds have a good amount of plant based protein, fiber and healthy fats. On top of that they’re high in vitamin E and magnesium. And they’re gluten and dairy free.

You can download and print the recipe here

Tamari is the gluten free version of soya sauce – it’s made with only fermented soya beans, where as most soya sauces are made with soya beans and wheat. So if you like to keep it gluten free it’s important to read the label.

Nuts are nutritious and should be part of your diet – except of course when you’re allergic or sensitive to them. If you are, try tamari coating and roasting pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds!

Because nuts and seeds can be high in calories and some are high in oxalates the advice is to not go crazy on them; keep it to 100 grams a day or less.

Do you eat nuts and seeds every day? Let us know in the comments!

A lovely coconut white fish dish

White fish, like cod, haddock or hake, is a great protein that is easy to digest for most people.

This looks like a lovely recipe and I’m going to try it out tonight!

I think I’ll replace the orange juice by a few more tomatoes. I don’t like orange in my food!

(worst thing: chocolate with orange 🤢!)

Are you a fish eater? Would you use the orange juice? Let me know in the comments!

You can download the recipe here:

Green sauce – easy to make and full of goodness

It’s the beginning of July now and the greens outside in my garden are thriving! At the moment I have an abundance of coriander, parsley and spring onions and I made them into a green sauce today.

There is a lot of goodness in this sauce. Parsley is very high in vitamin A and C and contains more iron than any other leafy green. It’s a diuretic (it removes excess water from the body), helps with cramping (period cramps!) and supports digestion.

Coriander also contains plentiful vitamin A, B and C and is packed with anti-oxidants. It is a strong antimicrobial and a digestive aid – great for those with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)! The most remarkable property is that it helps to move heavy metals out of the body.

Of course spring onion and garlic are very powerful antimicrobials and are also used a lot for lowering blood pressure.

You can use this sauce to cheer up any meal. I often use it on my salad. On new potatoes is also very delish. Just tried it on an oatcake with tahini, yum!

You can use the herbs you have and make a mixture: rocket, dill, young dandelion leaves, marjoram, lemon balm… You can make it with a blender or small food processor but also by just chopping finely and then mixing by hand.

Recipe:

  • 1 bunch of parsley (30 gr)
  • 1 bunch of coriander (30 gr) (or another bunch of parsley!)
  • 2 gloves of garlic (or more if you like)
  • 2 spring onions
  • 1/3 – 1/2 cup of your best quality olive oil
  • 2 tbsp of lemon or lime juice
  • 1/2 tsp of salt
  • pepper to taste
  • optional: add 1/4 tsp of chilli flakes and you’ve made chimichurri!

Chop greens, spring onion and mince garlic. Add the other ingredients and mix well.

Or: add everything to a blender and blend until smooth. That’s what I did. Enjoy!

10 minute gut healing jam

I used to make tons of jam from the berries in my garden. I had a recipe that used only half the sugar. But that’s still a lot of sugar. So I stopped doing that. And was looking for a way to make jam without a lot of sugar.

Now I make small batches with any kind of fruit available and use chia seeds to thicken it into a delicious jam. And this jam actually helps to keep your gut functioning well.

Berries are just great. They are loaded with anti-oxidants, have a good amount of plant nutrients, minerals and fiber and they help fight inflammation. Plus: the beneficial bacteria in your gut thrive on them.

More fiber, less sugar

Chia seeds also pack a nutritional punch. Almost all their carbs are fiber, they have a decent amount of protein ánd are high in Omega 3 fatty acids. I have not tried this yet but I think you could use the cheaper linseeds as well. They are just as amazing. I do think you need to use them freshly ground, so not whole.

I really love making this make jam without a lot of sugar!

Are you looking for more recipes? I post a weekly recipe on my blog.

Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of berries, any kind. They can be fresh or frozen
  • 2 tbps of chia seeds
  • 1-2 tbsp of unrefined sweetener (maple syrup or raw honey work well)
  • 1 tbsp of freshly squeezed lemon (optional, depending on the tartness of the fruit)

How to do it:

  1. Heat fruit in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the fruit is heated through and begins to break down and bubble. 
  2. Use a spoon or potato masher to mash the fruit to your desired consistency.
  3. Stir in the chia seeds and lemon juice. 
  4. Now add your sweetener to taste – but in moderation. Start with 1 tablespoon.
  5. Remove from heat and let cool for a bit. The jam will get thicker!
  6. Give the jam another good stir.  Then serve or transfer to a jar
  7. It keeps for up to 1 week in the fridge or , up to 3 months in the freezer.

Home made beet kvass, a probiotic drink

A few weeks ago my husband Hugo had to rush himself into hospital because a tiny splinter in his thumb had caused an infection that quickly turned into sepsis.

That was scary. Hallelujah for antibiotics! They probably saved his life.

He was on an antibiotic drip for two days and then on oral antibiotics for a week.

After that his sensitive digestion was off. He was bloated most of the day, had stomach pain and acid reflux. And he was tired.

You know, antibiotics didn’t just kill the bacteria in his thumb, but also disturbed the delicate balance of the bacteria in his gut.

He had already started taking probiotics in the hospital. And on top of that I made sure he ate homemade yoghurt, kefir, sauerkraut, pickles and a small glass of beet kvass every single day.

Three weeks later he’s feeling fine again.

Kvass is a traditional eastern European beverage that was originally made from fermenting stale bread. Made with beetroot it’s a beautiful deep red drink with a great taste. Here’s how you make it:

The recipe

Ingredients

For a 1 litre jar:

  • 1 medium organic beetroot
  • Filtered water
  • 5-6 slices of ginger (you can leave the skin on if organic)
  • 1.5 teaspoon good quality sea salt (so not table salt)

Materials

I like to use a fermentation jar because it’s super easy and the kvass doesn’t get moldy. That’s because these jars have an airlock; when the fermentation process starts, the bacteria produce CO2. That pushes the oxygen out of the jar and because of the airlock no new oxygen can come in.

I use Kilner 1 litre jars with regular sized mouth and special fermentation lids.

It doesn’t look like these are available at the moment but there are similar fermentation lids that fit on mason jars.

How to do it:

  • Brush the dirt off the beetroot, no need to peel
  • Chop the beetroot coarsely; pieces should be around dice size. Don’t grate or cut too finely; than it can turn into alcohol because the sugars are too available!
  • Cut 5-6 thin slices off a fresh ginger root
  • Pop beetroot and ginger into the jar and add the salt
  • Add water up until an inch under the lid. Shake a bit.
  • Put this on your kitchen top and wait for 4-6 days. Don’t open the lid in between
  • Strain out the beets and ginger and pour into a clean jar. Drink a small glass once or twice every day and store the rest in the fridge.
  • If you want a continuous supply, start a new jar every 4-6 days.
  • Adding a few tablespoons of the kvass of an earlier batch will start the process slightly quicker

Date and tahini fudge

Here is a recipe for something sweet and delicious and satisfying that doesn’t have any refined sugar, gluten or dairy.

I found it in one of the great cookbooks by the sisters Hemsley and Hemsley Good and Simple and I often bring it to parties and potlucks – so I know I can have a really delicious dessert as well 🙂

H&H call it Fridge Fudge but I think it tastes more like halva, but less sweet. Anyway, it has some good fiber, lots of minerals from the sesame seeds and good fats from the tahini and the coconut oil.

It’s a really simple procedure and there’s one important thing to remember: it needs to stay cooled. As soon as you leave it on the table for longer than say twenty minutes, it starts getting too soft and it loses it’s bite. Still great taste though.

You will need a simple food processor. Now you don’t need a big and expensive one; for this recipe I use the one that came with my stick blender. If you don’t have one of these, I think it worth considering. I use it almost every day: to blend soups and sauces, make energy balls and chop onions and garlic very finely.

Recipe

Makes 12 – 15 small squares

  • 85 gr dates: use the cheaper ones that are a bit harder and dryer, like these. So not the more expensive and squishy Medjool dates…
  • 110 gr tahini (I used light tahini)
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • a good pinch of sea salt
How to do it:
  • Put the dates (check for stones!), tahini, coconut oil and salt in the food processor
  • Process until you have a smooth mixture
  • Pour in a square or rectangular plastic tub
  • Put in the freezer for half an hour or in the fridge for an hour
  • Once hardened, tip it onto a cutting board and cut in small pieces (they are quite filling)
  • Eat straight out of the fridge or freezer and 
  • Enjoy!

Turmeric milk made my way

Golden or turmeric milk is a cow’s, nut or coconut milk, heated with a good amount of turmeric in it. I shouldn’t be saying this as a nutrition and herb expert because of it’s great properties, but… I didn’t like to drink it! The reason was that I used turmeric powder. That leaves you with quite a lot of bits in your milk and it has quite a strong bitter taste.

But now they’re selling fresh turmeric root in my local shop, so I decided to try again. Delicious! I loved it! Maybe you want to have a try as well.

Anti-inflammatory

Turmeric is well known for it’s anti-inflammatory properties. And this is not something woo woo to brush aside:  there are currently over 10,000 peer-reviewed articles published proving turmeric benefits, especially one of its renowned healing compounds, curcumin.

In several of those papers  the researchers  compared turmeric to conventional medicine, and found out it worked equally well or even better than the  pharmaceutical medication!

Recently turmeric has even been recognised for helping with depression!

Turmeric milk recipe

I like to use fresh ginger root in my turmeric milk as well, as it makes it nice and warming. And I do add a tiny bit of sweetener.

One warning: turmeric can stain your clothes yellow, so don’t wear your new white shirt and make sure you put on a apron!

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
  • 1 tbsp grated fresh turmeric
  • Optional: a teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 1/2 mug of coconut milk from a can, full fat
  • 1/2 mug of water
  • Or; 1 mug of home made nut or seed milk
  • A tiny bit of sweetener: 3 drops of liquid stevia or a teaspoon of raw honey or maple syrup, optional

Steps

  • Put all your ingredients except for the sweetener in a saucepan
  • Heat gently until hot but not boiling
  • Leave it on a very low heat for 5 minutes
  • Pour through a tea strainer and add the sweetener if you want
  • Enjoy!