What is functional nutrition?

Functional nutrition wants to restore the well-functioning of the body through food, lifestyle and supplement interventions. Sounds common sense, right? So how do I do that?

Root cause

To start with I want to find the root cause(s) of your health conditions rather than simply treating symptoms. An example. When you have gas and bloating you could take a pill from the chemist to be less bothered by your symptoms. But that doesn’t do anything about why you’re having them. Are you not chewing? Are you eating on the go? Do you have an imbalance in gut bacteria? Are you eating foods you’re sensitive to? By finding out what is causing your gas and bloating we can address things at the root.

What works for you?

The question is: how to find those root causes and see where we need to work. That’s where the systems I work with come in handy. I look extensively at your  history: your health and important events in your life. This allows me to get to know you well. And that’s necessary, because your body is different from my body. So your diet will need to be different from my diet. This is why I don’t work with one diet or protocol – it just often doesn’t work!

By mapping your symptoms I can see where we have some work to do: do we need to focus on gut health (always!), improve your immune system, support your liver, bring balance to your hormones, reduce the amount of toxins you’re exposed to?

Education empowers

Education is  very important part of functional nutrition. To start with I help you to master the skill of listening to your own body. Only when you learn to pick up the subtle – or sometimes not so subtle… – messages from your body, you can start to work out what works for you and what doesn’t. So you can take back control of your health and feel at home in your body.

By  educating you I also want to help you to understand how your body works, why you have your symptoms and why certain foods and practices are helpful or not. It helps to know why you need to change your diet and habits, it makes it easier to do. And something else:  when you know what works for you, you no longer get confused by the information about food you’re bombarded with in the media: is yoghurt healthy,  should you be eating raw, cooked, meat or eggs or be vegan? It all depends on your body and digestion.

When you know more about your diagnosis, your body and how to take care of yourself, you’ll be a more empowered partner in the conversation with your doctor or practitioner. You will know better which choices to make and your doctor will appreciate working with you because you genuinely take care of yourself.

I’m not a functional doctor, so my role is never to diagnose, treat, or prescribe. That’s outside my scope of practice. But I’m happy to work together with your doctor or other practitioners, like acupuncturists, psychotherapists, osteopaths, energy healers etc. Especially when you are dealing with a chronic issue it’s often not just about diet and lifestyle. There can be many root causes and they all need to be addressed.

Want to know more?

Are you curious about what I can do for you? Let’s talk on the phone then and explore if we are a good match. I see clients in person in Findhorn, Scotland but also work with people via Skype. So living somewhere else in the UK or even in Europe is not a problem at all.

Just send me a message via my contact form below so we can schedule your free 15 minute phone conversation.

A nice day for a warming lentil soup

Today is a really dark and rainy day. Perfect one for a warming and nourishing lentil soup!

 

I created this recipe for a class I was doing about spices; that’s why there are quite a few of them in this soup. Often people put in a pinch here and a dash there. But if you want to have the benefit of them, teaspoons work better.

Still this soup is not spicy and the spices aren’t overpowering. Here’s the recipe:

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 tablespoons – ¼ cup of olive oil
1 medium onion
2 medium carrots
2 garlic cloves
2 teaspoons cumin
2 teaspoons coriander
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon fennel
1 bay leaf
1 cinnamon quill
1 inch of freshly grated ginger
½ a cup of tomato passata or ½ a can of chopped tomato
1 cup red lentils
1 litre vegetable bouillon (4 teaspoons of bouillon powder) or chicken broth
salt to taste
lemon juice to taste
optional: fresh chopped greens on top

How to do it:

  • Chop onion, garlic and carrot. Grate ginger
  • Saute onion, garlic and ginger in olive oil.
  • Add carrots
  • Then add the spices and saute for two more minutes
  • Add the bouillon powder and then the water
  • Rinse the lentils under cold water and add them. Stir and let come to a boil.
  • Lower heat, let it simmer very gently for 20 minutes. Stir regularly
  • Add tomatoes, stir and taste. Does it need more salt? Acidity (tomato or lemon)? Depth (a bit more oil or some ghee? Or nutritional yeast)?

Serve and enjoy!

 

 

A basic hummus recipe: easy, delicious and versatile

Hummus is such a versatile and easy to make dish! I make this hummus recipe nearly every week because it’s a great one to have in my fridge in case of a snack attack. Or when the lunch of dinner I made is a bit bland or low in protein and healthy fats. This one is great for blood sugar and hormone balance!

It’s lovely as a snack with carrot, cucumber or bell pepper cut in sticks. A great one to bring with you when traveling as well!

Dried chickpeas vs cans

I use dried chickpeas, as ‘they’ use hormone balance disrupting Bisphenol-A (BPA) for the lining of the cans. Even the organic ones. Yikes! And I can’t find any beans in glass near to me. Anyway, cooking your chickpeas is easy peasy and cheap.

I start with a cup of dried chickpeas and soak them overnight with two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar. This makes them a lot easier to digest. In the morning I rinse them well and discard any dark ones. Then I gently cook them with some salt until they are firm and not mushy. It depends on their age how long it takes! If they are too firm, let them simmer for another half hour with the lid on.

This would give you enough to store some in the freezer so you’ll have enough for 3 or 4 batches of hummus!

 


Recipe

Serves 4
Ingredients:

  • 1 heaping cup of cooked chickpeas
  • 1 tbsp of fresh lemon juice. You can add more after tasting.
  • 1 big or two small garlic cloves
  • 1 level teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ tsp of salt
  • ½ cup of tahini
  • 4 tbsp of water
  • 2 tbsp of olive oil
  • optional: smoked paprika powder

You can use a small or big a food processor or a hand held blender for this. Don’t have any of these? No problem. You can also use a fork. Make sure you cut the garlic very finely or use garlic powder (1/4 tsp) to avoid having a big clump of raw garlic…

How to do it:

  1. Strain chickpeas
  2. Press or finely cut garlic
  3. Put chickpeas, salt, tahini, garlic, 1 tbsp of olive oil, 2 tbsp of water, cumin in food processor or container for blender.
  4. Blend and then taste! Make thinner with water and add salt, lemon, garlic or cumin to taste.
  5. Put in a bowl, drizzle the rest of the olive oil over it and shake some (smoked) paprika powder on for taste and beauty.